Lebanese women breaking barriers in civil aviation | Samar Kadi | AW

source: thearabweekly.com

Hoteit said the biggest challenge for women pilots is reconciling the job with family life. The unfriendly work schedule involves night flights or being away from home for several days at a time. In one instance, her son was hospitalised while she and her husband, also an airline pilot, were away on duty. MEA now has six women among its 190 pilots and first officers and is expected to add more female pilots. “We believe in women’s capacities despite our culture that sees flying as a male career,” said Captain Ahmad Mansour, MEA’s head of operations. “The job does not require muscles. Candidates, be they men or women, must have the passion of flying, the skills and the promptitude to act rightfully and under stress. Flying is no easy task but if one has the will and capacity, he or she can do it,” Mansour said. Hoteit said she believes she succeeded not only in becoming a pilot but in “opening the way for other women to embark on a flying career and breaking stereotypes.”

Lebanese women breaking barriers in civil aviation | Samar Kadi | AW

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